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Knightstown Preliminary Architectural Feasibility Study
Rehabilitation of a Historical Building
HOOSIER GYM
KNIGHTSTOWN, INDIANA
355 North Washington Street
Knightstown, Indiana 46148
Prepared By:
Table of Contents
General Information …………………………………………………………………………………………………………….. 3
Introduction ……………………………………………………………………………………………………………………….. 3
Project Location ………………………………………………………………………………………………………………….. 4
History ………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………. 4
Existing Facility Conditions ………………………………………………………………………………………………….. 6
Existing Structural Conditions ……………………………………………………………………………………………….. 6
Timeline of Prior Improvements …………………………………………………………………………………………….. 7
Needs For The Facility …………………………………………………………………………………………………………. 8
Proposed Facility Improvements…………………………………………………………………………………………….. 9
Building Sites ……………………………………………………………………………………………………………………. 11
Construction Issues ……………………………………………………………………………………………………………. 11
Opinion of Probable Costs …………………………………………………………………………………………………… 12
Funding Options………………………………………………………………………………………………………………… 12
Conclusions and Recommendations ………………………………………………………………………………………. 17
Appendix A………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………. 18
Appendix B ………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………. 21
Appendix C ………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………. 31
Appendix D………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………. 33
Appendix E ………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………. 35
Appendix F ………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………. 43
Appendix G………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………. 47
Page 2
General Information
RD instruction 1942 – A (Guide 6) Preliminary Architectural Feasibility Report was used as a
guide in the preparation of this report. The study was funded by proceeds from the Hoosier Gym
Board.
Introduction
The Hoosier Gym Board has entered into an agreement with Kieser Consulting Group, LLC
(Consultant) to prepare a Preliminary Feasibility Study for the purpose of completing a
rehabilitation project for the historical Hoosier Gym building located 355 North Washington
Street. The study will evaluate the current conditions of the Hoosier Gym and determine
appropriate solutions.
A Feasibility Study is a process that defines exactly what a project is and what strategic issues
need to be considered to assess its feasibility associated with the historical Hoosier Gym building
in the Town of Knightstown. Nothing in this report shall be construed as definitive or exhaustive
by the consultant. All dimensions, cost, limits, areas, numbers of units, etc. noted in this report
shall be deemed preliminary and/or assumed, without more definitive information obtained
beyond the scope of this report.
The Knightstown Forward Committee is compiled of different committees and community
members. These committees and community members include; Beautify Knightstown Inc.,
Historic Knightstown Inc., and the Hoosier Gym and Community Center, Inc. Knightstown
Forward Committee generated a list of proprieties according to highest impact it had on the
community. This list consists of 15 areas of priority and need of improvements. The committee
members were able to narrow it down to three major areas:
1. Hoosier Gym
2. Sunset Park trail & bridge
3. Downtown Audio System
On October 4, 2017, the Knightstown Forward Committee held a meeting and discusses the
needs for the Hoosier Gym Community Center, Inc. It was determined the Hoosier Gym
Community Center, Inc. had the highest impact and best scenario for immediate funding. On
December 6, 2017 a meeting was held to discuss possible ways of funding and what is expected
in the coming months. The Knightstown Forward Committee along with Kieser Consulting
Group has developed an outline with milestones dates to move forward with the rehabilitation of
the Hoosier Gym Community Center, Inc. Please see Appendix F, for the Knightstown Forward
Committee Members, Priorities List, and Hoosier Gym Improvement Timeline. Appendix D
contains information regarding public information about the project articles, and meeting notes.
Page 3
Project Location
The Town of Knightstown, Indiana is located in Henry County Indiana, east of Indianapolis. The
Town has a land area of 1.04 square miles with a population of 2,112. The Hoosier Gym is
located on 355 North Washington Street, Knightstown, Indiana. See Appendix A for location and
site maps, and aerial photograph.
History
The Town of Knightstown was platted in 1827; it was not until 1837 that it was officially
incorporated. Knightstown was named after Jonathan Knight, a Pennsylvanian and chief
engineer. Who worked on the nation’s first federally funded highway, the National Road.
Knightstown throughout the years has expanded not only in population, but economically. The
main street is also known as U.S. 40 National Road. This National Road has contributed to the
town growth and community’s need for schools, community centers, shops. The Hoosier Gym is
a perfect example of how the community has adapted this building over the years to fit the
growing needs of the community of Knightstown.
Hoosier Gym History
The first school was built in 1832, on the corner of Jefferson and Jackson Streets. The building
was 25 – foot – by – 30 – foot frame, following a few years later another school building was
constructed on the corner of Brown and Front Street. Then another building was built in 1850,
but only to be replaced by another building in 1858. In 1920, the community and business
leaders recognized that the Knightstown Community School had no gymnasium. Basketball
games were held in Bell’s Hall and in the basement gym of the Presbyterian Church. As the
community grew so did the needs for the community and in 1922 the Hoosier Gym was
constructed. 1 The Hoosier Gym is 105 feet long and 80 feet wide. The Hoosier Gym not only
served for basketball games and
spectators, but also held many
community events. The gymnasium
was built through donations from
more than 250 private citizens and
several local businesses. The
community came together and with
creativity they found ways to raise
money and within four years the
school board paid the final payment
and took full ownership. As the
population continued to grow so did
the demands for the Hoosier Gym.
Improvements were made in 1936
using Work Progress Administration
Figure 1: Hoosier Gym Front Lobby
Funds; this included the front lobby of
1
Trent, K. P. (2010). Knightstown. Charleston, SC: Arcadia Pub.
Page 4
the building, and basement dressing room. The Hoosier Gym was closed in 1966, due to the
construction of a new high school that included a more modern gymnasium. Knightstown came
into the spotlight in 1986, when the movie “Hoosiers” was filmed in the Hoosier Gym. 2 The old
high school gymnasium went from being obsolete to the home of Hickory Huskers. The movie
helped Hoosier Gym became the home of high school basketball. Since the movie the only
updates to the gymnasium have been the scoreboards and three – point line on the court. Three
years later the Hoosier Gym was listed on the National Register of Historic Places. Now, the
Hoosier Gym is an open community center where Knightstown residents can enjoy open gym
time in this historical place. It has also become a “must see” tourist attraction for basketball
enthusiasts.
Future Use
The Hoosier Gym has no plans on closing its doors anytime soon as more Athletic Associations
are bringing their teams to play and experience the nostalgia of the history of high school
basketball. In 2017, estimated 65,000 people were expected to attend and more than 80 high
schools schedule basketball games for 2017 – 2018 season. The Ohio High School Athletic
Association OHSAA plans to bring 12 teams in for a six game event in 2018. These types of
events will not only benefit the gymnasium itself, but will have an economic impact in the town
of Knightstown and surrounding communities. 3
2
3
Hoosier Gym Community Center, Inc. (n.d.). The Historic Hoosier Gym[Brochure]. Knightstown, IN: Author.
Schuman , T. (2018, Jan. & feb.). Hoops Heaven Henry County Home to Basketball History . BIZ VOICE , 28-31.
Page 5
Existing Facility Conditions
Currently, the Hoosier Gym is operating and serving as a community center /open gymnasium
for the residents of Knightstown and is now known as the Hoosier Gym Community Center, Inc.
The Hoosier Gym has the capacity to accommodate 675 people with 18 inch wide seats. The
Hoosier Gym has a Protective Covenant set by the Historic Landmark Foundation of Indiana in
1992. The Deed states that all improvements must be approved first by the Historic Landmark
Foundation of Indiana Eastern Regional Office in Cambridge, Indiana. Please find the Protective
Covenant in Appendix E. Refer to Appendix A for site maps and Appendix B contains
photographs of the building.
Existing Structural Conditions
Roof
The gymnasium’s existing roofing system consists of a wood tongue and groove decking with a
rubber membrane cover on the exterior. As the existing system nears the end of its life cycle the
system has developed conditional issues such as cracking and splitting of the membrane material.
Because of these issues the existing exterior membrane system was resurfaced with a silicone
based coating in 2016, in order to prolong the life of the existing system.
Masonry
The Hoosier Gym’s façade masonry is composed of lime mortar joints that are deteriorating .The
building needs improvements on the North and South of the gymnasium and other small areas.
The Hoosier gym has mortar joints that are deteriorating and are causing to have cracks in the
mortar joints, disintegrating mortar, and damp walls.
Windows
The current windows are not original. The original windows were replaced in 1990. Further
evaluations of the windows at the Hoosier Gym determine that windows needed complete
replacement. Replacement of the all double – pane windows is needed due to cracks, chipped
wood, and the lack of weatherization. Heat escapes through the cracks during the winter,
resulting in high energy costs.
Entrance Doors
Currently, the exterior and interior entrance doors in the vestibule are deteriorating and need of
improvements. The exterior and interior doors lack weather-stripping allowing cold air in during
the winter and in the summer cooling air escape through the doors. This increases the energy cost
year round for the Hoosier Gym Community Center. Providing proper improvements options
will help reduce energy cost and improve energy efficiency for the building.
Page 6
Timeline of Prior Improvements
The following alterations have been done to the Hoosier Gym. This is also a reflection of the
amount of work that the Hoosier Gym has had in the last 96 years.
Page 7
Needs For The Facility
The Hoosier Gym plays a huge role in the community of Knightstown. Over the years buildings
can take a lot of wear and tear, and it is very important to maintain them properly. The Hoosier
Gym is need of rehabilitation to the structure itself. Making improvements to the structure will
help to preserve this historic gymnasium. The proposed Hoosier Gym Improvements Project will
include the following:





A new roofing system.
Tuck- pointing of brick and mortar on the outside façade of the building.
Window replacement of 31 windows.
Replace front entrance doors with more energy efficient alternative.
Replace Exterior insulation and Finish System (EIFS) on the eastside of the gym
building.
Page 8
Proposed Facility Improvements
The proposed improvements will follow all requirements and standards for historic
rehabilitation. Information on several of the most relevant preservation guidelines is contained in
Appendix C. This project will protect the historic property’s materials and features while
incorporating energy efficiency upgrades.
Roof System
Replacement
In order to reduce the facility operation costs and prevent moisture infiltration, a new membrane
roofing system is proposed. In the process of selecting a replacement roofing system, it was
determined that a thermoplastic roof would provide a greater benefit, as opposed to the black
membrane roof, because of its ability to reflect more UV rays than a traditional black roof. UV
ray absorption during the long days of summer has been a source for increased building air
conditioning costs in the past. The thermoplastic roof will have an R- value of 25. The new
system aims to reduce those facility operation costs.
In addition to reducing facility operation costs, the installation of the new system by trained
professionals will also provide a cohesive barrier to stop moisture infiltration through the roofing
system.
The replacement of the existing system will include removal of the existing membrane system,
inspection and repair of the existing decking if needed, and installation of a new membrane
roofing system. Because the tongue and groove decking is visible from within the building, it is
very important that its condition is inspected and treated properly throughout the roofing
replacement process. The current design of roof system will remain as a barrel roof to preserve
the integrity of historic gymnasium.
Restoration
Restoration of the roof is no longer possible due to the condition in which the roof is currently in.
The cost to maintain the current roof over time will be more than the cost of replacing the roof
system and eventually the roof will need replacement. The benefits of replacement are greater
and will expand the life of the structure.
Windows
Evaluations of the windows at the Hoosier Gym determine that windows needed complete
replacement. The windows also need tuck-pointing and weatherization to ensure energy
efficiency. Replacement of the 31 double-pane windows is needed due to the condition in which
they are in. Selecting replacement windows must fit the criteria based on The Secretary of the
Interior’s Standards for Rehabilitation under Preservation Briefs 9: The Repair of Historic
Wooden Windows.
The new windows will consider the following:
Page 9







the pattern of the of the openings and size
proportions of the frame and sash;
configuration of window panes;
muntin profiles;
type of wood;
paint color;
characteristics of the glass; and associated details such as arched tops, hoods, or other
decorative elements.
Replacing the windows and adding high quality storm windows should provide more thermally
performance then a new double-glazed metal window. In addition, providing appropriate
weather-stripping to reduce air infiltration will add another layer for energy efficiency. The
American Society of Heating, Refrigerating and Air- Conditioning Engineers (ASHRAE) 1977
Fundamentals state the u-values for single glazed wooden windows have a range from 0.88 to
0.99, adding a storm window can reduced to a range of 0.44 to 0.49.
Repointing Mortar Joints
The Hoosier Gym has masonry deterioration at the mortar joints outside façade of the building.
Repointing also known as “tuck-pointing” removes deteriorated mortar from the joints of a
masonry wall and replaces it with new mortar. According to the Preservation Briefs 2:
Repointing Mortar Joints in Historic Masonry Buildings: new mortar will follow the listed
criteria to ensure the repointing is done to match that of the historic building:




The new mortar must match the historic mortar in color, texture and tooling.
The sand must match the sand in the historic mortar.
The mortar must have greater vapor permeability and be softer than the masonry units.
The new mortar must be as vapor permeable and as soft as or softer than the historic
mortar.
The repointing will be primarily used on the North and South sides of the building, and where as
needed only. Lime mortar will be used to repoint the deteriorating joints and will conform to the
ASTM C 207. This will keep the cost down, but provide much needed work on the mortar that is
deteriorating. Repointing will preserve the masonry of any loose bricks, dump walls, and cracks.
Entrance Doors Energy Efficient Alternatives
Option 1: Restoration of the Entrance Doors
Restoring the existing entrance doors is the safest and is the most cost effective option, it will
maintain the original material preserved, as is the original design intent. Less damage can occur
to the materials surrounding the wall cavity than if the exiting doors are removed due to the
design. Option 1 includes the following:


Stripping of the wooden door, restoration carpentry and refinishing it
Replacing the glass with a more energy efficient material (fiberglass)
Page 10

Adding appropriate weather-stripping
Option 2: Replacement of Doors
Replacing the doors completely would require custom made doors in order to follow the
Standards for Rehabilitation of a historic building set by the Secretary of the Interior’s Standards.
This option can have a high cost as it requires the remaking of a new custom door. Replacing the
entrance doors will consider the following:




The new door must match the door being replaced in design;
Color and or finishes;
Must not damage the surrounding wall cavity;
Include appropriate weather-stripping
Exterior Insulation and Finish System (EIFS) Replacement
The Exterior Insulation and Finish System (EIFS) is an exterior wall classing that utilizes rigid
insulation boards on the exterior of the wall sheathing with a plaster appearance on the exterior.
The EIFS will be applied on the eastside of the gym using the barrier wall system. The EIFS
barrier wall system is a base coat portion of the exterior wall to resist water penetration.
It will help with the following issues:
Thermal – It reduces thermal loads on the exterior building walls, its low cost and can be sculpted
into shapes and patterns to keep the integrity of the building.
Moisture Protection – Water penetration prevention into the interior of the wall.
Building Sites
The building site is accessible through North Adams Street. The Hoosier Gym sits on the corner
of North Washington Street and Penn Street. The building sits on 0.70 acres of land. Early

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