Chat with us, powered by LiveChat IAH241C Impact of Carbon Dioxide on Food Production in China Poster | All Paper
+1(978)310-4246 credencewriters@gmail.com
  

read my writing paper and make a poster, No other requirement. Thanks
final_project.docx

Unformatted Attachment Preview

1
The impact of carbon dioxide on food production in China
Name: Kai Chen
Class: Iah 241C
Date:4/28/2019
Abstract
China is one of the largest developing countries in the world which means that its huge
population requires a similarly large amount of food production to sustain it. China cannot afford
to rely on global food production for its domestic food needs. As of today, China faces a huge
problem where it is unable to figure out how it can be able to meet its increasing domestic food
demands as well as finding a way of reducing greenhouse gases emissions. For this assignment, I
ended up creating a poster that put into perspective the impact of carbon dioxide on food
production in China. In the poster, I was able to outline the various impacts that increased level
of carbon dioxide has had on food production in China. Additionally, I was able to showcase
how the increased levels of carbon dioxide (which is expected to increase in the future) would
affect the country’s food production capability in the future. By taking heed of my instructor’s
feedback, I was able to refine my topic where I narrowed it down to a specific issue. In the latter
stage of this paper, I would elaborate on how the feedback made my poster to become better and
effective at the same time.
2
The impact of carbon dioxide on food production in China
Already one of the largest food and agricultural producers in the world, China’s food
production is booming. But so are the emissions, especially greenhouses gases. As it stands
today, China is the biggest emitter of greenhouse gases in the world.1 To make things worse, it
has now been established that China could peak its greenhouse gases emission by 2030 or even
earlier than that. Of all the carbon dioxide emitted in the world, China accounts for a quarter of
it.2 Unexpectedly, the high percentage of the nation’s carbon dioxide has ended up having both a
positive and a negative impact on the country’s food production capacity.
China has introduced great food production technologies in the recent past that included
the use of pesticides and fertilizers that resulted in increased agricultural inputs. But the resultant
agricultural inputs have also resulted in increased carbon dioxide emission as well as other
greenhouse gases emissions.3 Consequently, the rising levels of carbon dioxide in the region had
ended up reducing the concentration of protein and other key minerals for different plants species
such as rice, and wheat. The direct effect of the increased level of carbon dioxide on impacting
the nutritional content and value of crops has ended up creating a huge potential threat to human
health among the Chinese population.
Jeff Tollefson, “China’s Carbon Emissions Could Peak Sooner than Forecast,” Nature 531, no.
7595 (2016): , doi:10.1038/531425a.
1
2
Shilu Tong et a., “Climate Change, Food, Water and Population Health in China,” Bulletin of
the World Health Organization 94, no. 10 (2016): , doi:10.2471/blt.15.167031.
3
Dan Zhang et al., “Carbon Footprint of Grain Production in China,” Scientific Reports 7, no. 1
(2017): doi:10.1038/s41598-017-04182-x.
3
While there is no denying the fact that China is doing its level best to curb its carbon
dioxide emissions by the implementation of various policies and regulations, the current state of
increased carbon dioxide has had a negative impact on food production in the region. Not only
are the different food species being produced lacking the required nutritional values, but it has
also affected the livestock industry. In fact, the rising level of carbon dioxide in China has
resulted in increased production of different crops such as wheat, soya beans, and rice, but it has
also compromised the quality of such crops to some extent.4 It has been established that
increased concentration of carbon dioxide in China has been able to stimulate photosynthesis by
a margin of 0.05% for maize and 0.08% for rice.5 In so doing, the increased level of carbon
dioxide in the region has resulted in increased food productivity.
My Creative Work
For my creative work segment, I choose to create a poster on Curbing Industrial Carbon
emission in China. But I had to refine it later on after my instructor had recommended that I
narrow the topic down to one specific issue. As such, I changed the topic to the current topic
where I ended setting forth to establish two things. The first goal was to put into perspective the
current state of food production in China amidst its increased level of carbon dioxide that has
been witnessed within the last decade. Secondly, I took a look at how the increasing level of
carbon dioxide was and is going to affect food production capability in the region. I was able to
4
Shilu Tong et al., “Climate Change, Food, Water and Population Health in China,” Bulletin of
the World Health Organization 94, no. 10 (2016): , doi:10.2471/blt.15.167031.
5
Dan Zhang et al., “Carbon Footprint of Grain Production in China,” Scientific Reports 7, no. 1
(2017): , doi:10.1038/s41598-017-04182-x.
4
show that China’s increasing use of modern technology in the production of different plant
species has resulted in increased levels of carbon dioxide. Additionally, my poster showed that
the increased level of carbon dioxide in China is both a positive and a negative thing. The main
question will be up to the policymakers to determine if the benefits of having increased levels of
carbon dioxide on food production outweigh its demerits. In the end, the poster that I created was
able to add flesh to my research on the implications of increased carbon dioxide in China by
painting the picture of the actual implication that carbon dioxide has had so far on food
production in the region. Consequently, my poster showcased that China has benefited quite a lot
from increased carbon dioxide levels when it comes to food production. The negative parts have
only been minimal and are expected to be handled in the nearby future
I was very overwhelmed by the feedback that I received from the instructor. This was the
case as the feedback showcased that I was headed in the right direction. I unknowingly had
ended up addressing the topic from a general point of view, something that my instructor was
able to point out. My instructor requested me to narrow my topic down to one specific issue. As
such, I quickly changed my topic from “Curbing Industrial Carbon Emission” to my current
topic. In fact, the feedback was very helpful, as after I had picked a specific issue to address, I
was able to do a more refined research that gave me a real picture of the current issue. In the end,
the instructors’ feedback proved to be a pivotal part of making my poster to be effective.
5
Bibliography
Tollefson, Jeff. “China’s Carbon Emissions Could Peak Sooner than Forecast.” Nature 531, no.
7595 (2016): 425. doi:10.1038/531425a.
Tong, Shilu, Helen L. Berry, Kristie Ebi, Hilary Bambrick, Wenbiao Hu, Donna Green,
Elizabeth Hanna, Zhiqiang Wang, and Colin D. Butler. “Climate Change, Food, Water
and Population Health in China.” Bulletin of the World Health Organization 94, no. 10
(2016): 759-65. doi:10.2471/blt.15.167031.
Zhang, Dan, Jianbo Shen, Fusuo Zhang, Yu’E Li, and Weifeng Zhang. “Carbon Footprint of
Grain Production in China.” Scientific Reports 7, no. 1 (2017). doi:10.1038/s41598-01704182-x.

Our essay writing service fulfills every request with the highest level of urgency.
attachment