Chat with us, powered by LiveChat Interview a person who work in the dental field and Write a report describing what you have learned about the kinds of written communication skills you will need in this field. | All Paper
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Assignment: Interview a person or persons who work in the dental field and Write a report describing what you have learned about the kinds of written communication skills you will need in this field. I chose to interview a doctor named: Dr. Omar Sabbagh, he is a general dentist that I have worked with as a dental assistant for three months. Unfortunately, I could not make it to the interview, so what you have to do is to pretend that the interview was done and try to collect as much information to put in the report as possible. You can use Purdue OWl website, it is really helpful! I have attached the assignment proposal(That I have submitted previously),the ACTUAL assignment and some examples of old reports (Not supposed to be exactly the same as these because they have different careers) For any questions, please contact me!Thanks.
workplace_report_assignment__online__fall_18__6_.docx

workplace_report_assignment__online__fall_18__6_.docx

workplace_report_assignment_proposal.docx

example_workplace_writing_assignment__judge_1___4_.docx

technical_writing_interview__sample_a_1___2_.odt

workplace_writing__government_program_director_1_.docx

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RWS 305W—Sherman
Workplace Writing Report for Project Four (150 points)
Instructions for the Presentations Slide part of the assignment will be posted separately)
Deadlines –
➢ Discussion Board: Interview Questions
➢ Discussion Board: Share Presentation Slide-feedback
➢ Interview Notes/Texts for Analysis Due
➢ Presentation Slides
➢ Final Draft Due Report with contact information for interviewee, interview notes and genre texts.
Audience: I am your audience.
Requirements: Because workplace report formats vary widely, it’s difficult to give a page requirement for
this assignment. Although your report will be single-spaced, I would suggest making sure that your
workplace report equals a six-eight page, typed, double-spaced paper. (1500-2000 words)
What is a Workplace report?
Reports in the workplace vary, of course, depending upon the field, purpose, and many other factors. You
can use the National Commission on Writing’s report on workplace writing as an example or any other
workplace report you may find during your research. Your report should use headings to separate
different sections (you can break specific sections down too). Most of your text will be in block paragraphs.
You will probably use bullet-points to set off ideas within a section. We will look at some examples in class.
Assignment
➢ Interview a person or persons who work in a career area you are interested in. The interview
should be synchronous, that is, in real time – ideally a video chat, if not in person. As discussed in
the “How to Interview” video, the most successful interviews are like conversations where you are
doing most of the listening. Being able to ask questions which help the interviewee expand on their
answers is essential. . Find out what kinds of written communication skills you will need, what
kinds of writing you will be expected to do, and what formats, genres, and audiences you will need
to deal with.
➢ Collect a minimum of two samples of writing from your field. (Your interviewee might be able to
provide this—but you shouldn’t count on that.) Then you will analyze this writing in order to
determine the qualities and characteristics of writing in your field. This may include (but isn’t
limited to) rhetorical profile and consideration of ethos (how is ethos established?). The goals of
this analysis are to become more aware of the writing styles and situations in your intended
profession, as well as to demonstrate your ability to apply rhetorical analysis to a text.
➢ Write a report describing what you have learned about the kinds of written communication skills
you will need in your chosen field. Specific instructions for organization are explained below. Here
are some questions to get you thinking. What kinds of writing will you be expected to do? What are
the formats, genres, styles and audiences will you be working with? You might also want to
consider the extent to which you feel prepared for these tasks, what you will need to learn, etc. You
may want to compare your field with what you found out about another field during class sharing
(optional). Finally, don’t feel limited by these questions. Feel free to present any interesting
information you gained during your interview!
Organization
Your report should have four major sections. You are welcome to organize within those sections however
you choose, ideally using the form appropriate to your field. Whatever form you choose, your report
should have different sections with headers and be single spaced.
 Part One—background information on the interview and your interviewee. When and where you
conducted the interview, how long he/she has held his/her current position. What were the steps
leading to this position? (250-300 words)
 Part Two—what you have learned about writing in this field or discipline. This should be fully
developed and consider all aspects of written communication. (500-750 words.)
 Part Three—analysis of the texts you have collected. (500-750 words) See guidelines below. You
might choose instead to incorporate information from your analysis into Part Two – either way is
fine.
 Part Four—Consider your writing future. What, if anything, surprised you about what you have
learned? What will you need to learn to be a successful writer? What parts of writing in your
future work concern you? What are you looking forward to? (250 words).
Text Analysis (Part Three above)
Choose two different kinds of documents for this analysis. You can compare/contrast them or write about
them separately—whichever seems most logical to you. Needless to say, choosing an email and a standard
contract, for instance, wouldn’t give you much to work with. The meatier the document, the easier this
assignment will be. Also, don’t be afraid of large documents like reports. You can answer the general
questions as easily for longer documents as for short ones. For the textual analysis questions, you can work
with specific sections of the document. Be sure to support your analysis with direct citations from the text.
You should work to answer most of the following questions (these questions should guide you, but you
shouldn’t simply answer them in a list):
 What is the document?
 Where did it come from and who produced it?
 Who is the intended audience (or audiences) for the text?
 What is the purpose of the document?
 How, if at all, are ethos, pathos and logos apparent in the text? What seem to be the values implied in
the text?
 What do you notice about the language (of course, the answer to this will help you address the above
questions too)? Is there jargon? Euphemistic language and/or buzzwords? What is the tone of the
text? Is there a voice—can you here the writer or is it meant to be more neutral?
 Bonus: using Winston Weather’s Rhetorical Profile, how would you describe the level and texture of the
writing? Be sure to explain your answer.
Considering the information above, what observations can you make about these texts overall? In what
ways might they be seen to reflect the workplace or field that you are researching?
Major Learning Goals for this Assignment
 Analyze and Evaluate complex print, digital, and multimodal texts that engage significant
academic, professional, or civic issues.
 Apply rhetorical principles appropriate to different purposes and goals, within specific disciplinary,
professional and civic communities.
 Research and contribute to specific areas of inquiry by evaluating, synthesizing, and integrating
strategies and sources appropriate to genre.
 Compose a variety of texts, working individually and collaboratively, through processes of drafting,
critiquing, reflecting, and editing.
RWS 305W—Sherman
Workplace Writing Report for Project Four (150 points)
Instructions for the Presentations Slide part of the assignment will be posted separately)
Deadlines –
➢ Discussion Board: Interview Questions
➢ Discussion Board: Share Presentation Slide-feedback
➢ Interview Notes/Texts for Analysis Due
➢ Presentation Slides
➢ Final Draft Due Report with contact information for interviewee, interview notes and genre texts.
Audience: I am your audience.
Requirements: Because workplace report formats vary widely, it’s difficult to give a page requirement for
this assignment. Although your report will be single-spaced, I would suggest making sure that your
workplace report equals a six-eight page, typed, double-spaced paper. (1500-2000 words)
What is a Workplace report?
Reports in the workplace vary, of course, depending upon the field, purpose, and many other factors. You
can use the National Commission on Writing’s report on workplace writing as an example or any other
workplace report you may find during your research. Your report should use headings to separate
different sections (you can break specific sections down too). Most of your text will be in block paragraphs.
You will probably use bullet-points to set off ideas within a section. We will look at some examples in class.
Assignment
➢ Interview a person or persons who work in a career area you are interested in. The interview
should be synchronous, that is, in real time – ideally a video chat, if not in person. As discussed in
the “How to Interview” video, the most successful interviews are like conversations where you are
doing most of the listening. Being able to ask questions which help the interviewee expand on their
answers is essential. . Find out what kinds of written communication skills you will need, what
kinds of writing you will be expected to do, and what formats, genres, and audiences you will need
to deal with.
➢ Collect a minimum of two samples of writing from your field. (Your interviewee might be able to
provide this—but you shouldn’t count on that.) Then you will analyze this writing in order to
determine the qualities and characteristics of writing in your field. This may include (but isn’t
limited to) rhetorical profile and consideration of ethos (how is ethos established?). The goals of
this analysis are to become more aware of the writing styles and situations in your intended
profession, as well as to demonstrate your ability to apply rhetorical analysis to a text.
➢ Write a report describing what you have learned about the kinds of written communication skills
you will need in your chosen field. Specific instructions for organization are explained below. Here
are some questions to get you thinking. What kinds of writing will you be expected to do? What are
the formats, genres, styles and audiences will you be working with? You might also want to
consider the extent to which you feel prepared for these tasks, what you will need to learn, etc. You
may want to compare your field with what you found out about another field during class sharing
(optional). Finally, don’t feel limited by these questions. Feel free to present any interesting
information you gained during your interview!
Organization
Your report should have four major sections. You are welcome to organize within those sections however
you choose, ideally using the form appropriate to your field. Whatever form you choose, your report
should have different sections with headers and be single spaced.
 Part One—background information on the interview and your interviewee. When and where you
conducted the interview, how long he/she has held his/her current position. What were the steps
leading to this position? (250-300 words)
 Part Two—what you have learned about writing in this field or discipline. This should be fully
developed and consider all aspects of written communication. (500-750 words.)
 Part Three—analysis of the texts you have collected. (500-750 words) See guidelines below. You
might choose instead to incorporate information from your analysis into Part Two – either way is
fine.
 Part Four—Consider your writing future. What, if anything, surprised you about what you have
learned? What will you need to learn to be a successful writer? What parts of writing in your
future work concern you? What are you looking forward to? (250 words).
Text Analysis (Part Three above)
Choose two different kinds of documents for this analysis. You can compare/contrast them or write about
them separately—whichever seems most logical to you. Needless to say, choosing an email and a standard
contract, for instance, wouldn’t give you much to work with. The meatier the document, the easier this
assignment will be. Also, don’t be afraid of large documents like reports. You can answer the general
questions as easily for longer documents as for short ones. For the textual analysis questions, you can work
with specific sections of the document. Be sure to support your analysis with direct citations from the text.
You should work to answer most of the following questions (these questions should guide you, but you
shouldn’t simply answer them in a list):
 What is the document?
 Where did it come from and who produced it?
 Who is the intended audience (or audiences) for the text?
 What is the purpose of the document?
 How, if at all, are ethos, pathos and logos apparent in the text? What seem to be the values implied in
the text?
 What do you notice about the language (of course, the answer to this will help you address the above
questions too)? Is there jargon? Euphemistic language and/or buzzwords? What is the tone of the
text? Is there a voice—can you here the writer or is it meant to be more neutral?
 Bonus: using Winston Weather’s Rhetorical Profile, how would you describe the level and texture of the
writing? Be sure to explain your answer.
Considering the information above, what observations can you make about these texts overall? In what
ways might they be seen to reflect the workplace or field that you are researching?
Major Learning Goals for this Assignment
 Analyze and Evaluate complex print, digital, and multimodal texts that engage significant
academic, professional, or civic issues.
 Apply rhetorical principles appropriate to different purposes and goals, within specific disciplinary,
professional and civic communities.
 Research and contribute to specific areas of inquiry by evaluating, synthesizing, and integrating
strategies and sources appropriate to genre.
 Compose a variety of texts, working individually and collaboratively, through processes of drafting,
critiquing, reflecting, and editing.
My dream is to have my own dental office and be the boss of myself one day. Since my
childhood, I have always dreamt of becoming a famous cosmetic dentist and see the smile of my
patients after each visit. Since I am majoring in pre-dental and since my dreams and goals are all
related to the dental field, I have decided to interview one of my favorite dentists, Dr. Omar
Sabbagh. Dr. Sabbagh has been a dentist in the US since 2001. Before that, he was a dentist in
Syria for more than 10 years. He has a great sense of humor and patience with his patients, he
tries his best to keep him/her comfortable and satisfied. I have worked with Dr. Sabbagh as a
dental assistant for more than three months and he made me love this career everyday more than
the day before. I have asked him if it is possible to schedule an interview with him to talk about
how writing is important in the life of a dentist and he did not mind at all. I scheduled an
interview on Tuesday, April 30th at 9:00 am.
RWS 305 – Sherman
Workplace Writing Assignment
Interviewee:
Superior Court Judge
William S. Dato
Workplace address:
Hall of Justice
Fourth Floor
330 W. Broadway
San Diego, CA 92101
Phone Number:
Courtroom Clerk:
Lynn Nicolas
619-XXX-XXXX
Background Information
The Interview
For this assignment I interviewed Superior Court Judge William S. Dato because I met
him last summer when I went to court with my dad on one of his trials. We were called
into his chamber and he was very friendly and he and I talked about my decision to
possibly attend law school. And I have recently become fascinated with the idea of
becoming a judge so I felt comfortable calling him to talk to about his profession. The
interview was conducted at the Hall of Justice, Downtown, Department 67. I met him in
the courtroom, where he was finishing up a conference and went through the
courtroom to his chambers; which is basically an office consisting of the usual desk,
couch and chairs, book cases, a desk for his law clerk and pictures of his family.
The Pathway to Becoming a Judge
Judge Dato’s interest in law started the way most young people’s do, with a love to
argue with other people. So after graduating from San Diego State University he went to
UCLA School of Law but he still did not know what area of law he wanted to go into. In
his sophomore year of law school he randomly came across an externship, an
opportunity for students in which the school pays for them to take a semester off to go
somewhere and get hands on experience and receive school credit, to be a clerk at the
Supreme Court of California in the offices of Justice Mathew O. Tobriner in San
Francisco. He applied and was accepted and this is where he really received his training
in proper legal writing. The clerkship had him start off right away writing “memos” to
the court, reading 100 page case briefs, summarizing and analyzing them and then
writing out a memo to tell the justices whether they should hear the case or not. This
taught him how to write short, concise, to the point and how to write tight analyses.
After his clerkship he graduated from UCLA and worked as a clerk in many other offices
and then went into private practice where he was a practicing lawyer. And in 2003 the
Governor of California appointed him to judgeship and he has been a judge in the field
of civil law for 8 years.
Writing in the Field
Judge Dato’s Opinion
After talking to him, it is very clear that he thinks very highly of being able to write well
and communicate one’s thoughts in any workplace environment. When I asked him
about how law school and his different jobs prepared him to write in this field he told
me that, “that good writing is good no matter what. There are different nuances but the
basics are all the same in all fields of work. And if you can put a sentence together
properly and grammatically correct, etc. that conveys your message you will set
yourself apart. “ He told me that being a successful writer is a skill that having as a
lawyer distinguishes you from the rest of lawyers. That from his experience, lawyers do
not usually write very much because they delegate the writing of briefs and legal
document to people farther down the corporate hierarchy and therefore lose their
ability to write. He thinks this is a terrible waste because, as he says, writing is very
important especially in civil law, because written briefs decide a case, not oral argument
like criminal law. Therefore you have to be able to write concisely and incorporate facts
persuasively to get a judge to see your point of view. He told me that he has taught
writing classes for young lawyers and he emphasizes the fact that “no matter what
you’re writing, it needs to tell a good story.” He supports this opinion by telling them
that facts can be lengthy and complicated and therefore need to be organized and
broken up to make the “story” easier to understand for the “reader”; he says that
“reading lengthy and complicated facts is like reading a novel without chapters”. The
second point that he highly stressed to me was that, although clarity is very important
in legal writing, no matter what kind of writing you do, it is also important to keep your
“reader” interested. As a judge he reads hundreds of briefs and finds that too many
lawyers write very dry, boring briefs because that is what lawyers are “supposed to do”.
But the best briefs, he says, are the ones that a written to be interesting and “tell a
story”.
Daily Writing
The main forms of writing Judge Dato produces are legal documents. When I asked him
about them specifically he told me the main documents he writes are tentative rulings,
which is the proposed ruling of the court before any sort of trial has begun. Parties who
disagree may wish to continue with oral argument at the scheduled legal motion time
(http://www.sdcourt.ca.gov). These range from ½ page to 10 pages and require a lot of
research so he divides these up with his research lawyer so he can devote his time to
writing Statements of Decision. These are final decisions that he writes about the
outcome of a case after the trial is over. These consist of the facts of the case, the legal
precedents and then his conclusion or ruling. These range from about 10-30 pages.
They are much more formal writing and done strictly by him because he is the one
sitting in the court room hearing the cases. And the last ma …
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