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– you must write in detail about works of art discussed in class;- you must write in detail about documents, spotlight on technique videos, and readings discussed in class;- you must communicate your ideas clearly; and- you must answer both questions in the prompt as fully as possible.40 points TOTAL:16 points Analysis of works of art discussed in class(from week1-5 group analysis&discussion); 6 points Use of weekly Documents;
6 points Use of weekly Spotlight on Technique Videos;
6 points Use of weekly Reading Exercises;
3 points Clarity (Communicate your ideas clearly.); 3 points Thoroughness (Fully answer both questions included in the prompt.)
week1_5group_analysis_discussion.pdf

1a_online_midterm_sp19.pdf

chapter_5_f18.pdf

reading_exercise.zip

week1_5_group_analysis_discussion.pdf.zip

week_1_5_reading_exercise.zip

week1_5_document_spotlight.zip

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ARTS 1A: Week 1 Group Analysis
Noticing artistic differences and similarities
Each week we participate in a group analysis. This week, let’s consider artistic differences
and similarities. As you take notes on Chapter 1, consider “Exercise 2” regarding the first
pair of images by Vincent van Gogh and Jiang Shijie. It reads as follows:
In what ways are these works so different that you would never mistake the
painting by Vincent van Gogh as the work of Jiang Shijie, and vice versa?
For our Week 1 Group Analysis, respond to the question above. I encourage you to write
about the similarities between these two works of art (since they are both “landscapes”) as
well as the differences between them, as you train your eye to ascertain differences
between artistic approaches.
You may post a comment independent of other students’ ideas, or you may add to the
posts of other students as you work to acquire up to two points of discussion credit for
participation in this Group Analysis.
If you have an opinion that is different from the opinions of your classmates—and you
probably will—use respectful language in stating your ideas.
* * *
ARTS 1A: Group Analysis 2
Continuity and change
Let’s consider artistic continuity and change. As you take notes on Chapter 2, consider
“Exercise 2” regarding the pair of cups by Ehren Tool and the artistic team of Pamphaios
and the Nikosthenes Painter. The question reads as follows:
While comparing these cups, consider the thousands of years that separates their
creation. How does the imagery on the cups indicate that warfare has changed
over the centuries? How does the imagery on the cups indicate that warfare has
remained the same?
For our second group analysis, respond to the questions above. While you will no doubt
have a ready opinion about warfare, the key here is to root your response in the details of
the cups themselves.
In other words, base your response on what you see in these works of art, while at the
same time allowing your opinions to shine through.
You may post a comment independent of other students’ ideas, or you may add to the
posts of other students as you work to acquire up to two points of discussion credit for
participation in this Group Analysis.
If you have an opinion that is different from the opinions of your classmates—and you
probably will—use respectful language in stating your ideas.
* * *
ARTS 1A: Discussion 2
Imagery of war
Each week we discuss new aspects of art. In this discussion we will consider imagery of war.
Consider this sculpture of a soldier in ancient Greece. The soldier’s name is not known to us,
but he once held a spear in his left hand, hence the title Doryphoros (Spear Bearer).
Address ONE or MORE of the following questions in your discussion post:
1. Why might ancient Greek sculptors have depicted male war heroes in the nude? They
also did this with representations of male athletes and with representations of gods.
2. What is significant about the fact that this sculpture by Polykleitos the Elder was
considered during antiquity to represent ideal proportions for a man’s body?
3. Consider the posture of the soldier. What is he doing? Is he walking or standing? Is he
engaged in battle, preparing for battle, or in the aftermath of battle?
4. If you were to design a sculpture memorializing a soldier today, how would you
represent the soldier? How would it be similar to or different from the Doryphoros?
* * *
ARTS 1A: Group Analysis 3
Addressing continuity and change
Each week we participate in a group analysis. This week, let’s consider artistic continuity
and change. As you take notes on Chapter 3 and read this week’s document, written by
Joshua Reynolds, consider this quote from Reynolds:
. . . examining the art itself by the standard of nature, he corrects what is
erroneous, supplies what is scanty, and adds by his own observation what
the industry of his predecessors may have yet left wanting to
perfection. Having well established his judgment, and stored his memory,
he may now without fear try the power of his imagination.
Address the following question in your group analysis post:
It would seem from this quote that Reynolds believed that a finished work of art
produced by an accomplished art student should be influenced by two things: 1) nature
(that is, the visible environment, including human bodies as part of nature) and 2)
imagination.
What evidence is there in The Archers that Reynolds followed—or did not follow—his
own advice? In other words, what references (or lack of references) are there to nature
in this work? And what aspects of this work may have been informed by Reynolds’s
imagination?
Build your response from what you read in Reynolds’s quote as well as what you see in
this work of art.
You may post a comment independent of other students’ ideas, or you may add to the
posts of other students as you work to acquire up to two points of discussion credit for
participation in this Group Analysis.
If you have an opinion that is different from the opinions of your classmates—and you
probably will—use respectful language in stating your ideas.
* * *
ARTS 1A: Discussion 3
Selfhood in art
This week we’ll consider imagery related to selfhood: those things about us that make up our
individuality.
Please see above a detail of the mosaic representation of the Empress Theodora, made in the
sixth century.
Address ANY of the following questions in your discussion post:
1. Looking closely at this mosaic image, what do you think Theodora was like as a person?
2. Theodora’s public life included maintaining both political and religious roles in society.
In what ways are her public duties communicated to viewers by this portrait?
3. In what ways did the mosaicist succeed in communicating that the empress was an
actual person with a physical life rather than simply a head of state?
4. With all of these things in mind, who was Theodora—what constituted her “selfhood”?
Use the mosaic itself to answer this question.
ARTS 1A: Group Analysis 4
Who convinces us?
For our group analysis this week we will consider the ways in which artists can convince us of
the reality of the worlds they create. As you review your notes on Chapter 4, consider again a
comparison of works by Carrie Mae Weems and Johannes Vermeer, and address the question
which follows.
Which artist—Carrie Mae Weems or Johannes Vermeer—has produced a convincing glimpse of
everyday life?
There is no “right” answer—just the answer that you can give with honesty and which is
based on careful analysis of these works of art. You may find that aspects of both works provide
convincing glimpses of everyday life; that one artist accomplishes this; or that neither artist
accomplishes this.
Because this is a group analysis you are encouraged to demonstrate sensitivity to your classmates,
whose opinions may be quite different from your own in light of your life experiences. As such,
focus on the ways in which your classmates write about specific details in these works of art, and
make sure that you, too, base your response on what you find in the details of one or both of
these images.
* * *
ARTS 1A: Discussion 4
Everyday life in art
This week we’ll consider imagery related to daily living: representations of our daily activities or
the activities of people around us.
Consider the Male Harp Player, a work of marble sculpture produced on a Greek island
thousands of years ago, as discussed in Chapter 4.
Address any ONE of the following questions in your discussion post; you are not required to
address all of the questions:
1. The Male Harp Player was likely produced to serve as a funerary object: an object
placed in a tomb or intentionally buried with a deceased person. Why might the ancient
Greeks have placed a representation of a professional musician—someone who made
music to make money—with a deceased person at a burial site?
2. What types of jobs do professional musicians seek out today, and how might your
understanding of the life of a professional musician now inform the way you understand
this work of ancient sculpture?
3. The Male Harp Player is not very detailed. Rather, the human figure and the harp are
represented by merely suggesting a human figure and a harp. Why do you think the
ancient sculptor(s) who produced this work chose to represent the man and the musical
instrument with such simplicity?
ARTS 1A: Group Analysis 5
Objects in our lives
Each week we analyze a work of art as a group. This week we will consider the still life subject
type, where a range of inanimate objects receive attention from artists.
Consider Rebecca Scott’s oil painting, Oh, it’s a perfect day (2005).
Address one—or both—of the following questions in your discussion post:
1. Examine the range of color used by this oil painter to represent objects on a table. She
paints things that our eyes would normally register as white, clear, or reflective (the
formal table linens, glassware, and silverware) in almost every color but “white”. Why
do you think she chose so many different colors to paint these objects?
2. Carefully consider the title of this work in relation to details within this painting. Why
might Rebecca Scott call this work, Oh, it’s a perfect day? Without the title, does the
painting itself reveal a perfect day? Why? Or why not?
* * *
ARTS 1A: Discussion 5
Non-Representational Art
For our discussion this week we will consider non-representational art.
Consider Richard Serra’s site-specific installation, Tilted Arc (1981).
Address any of the following questions in your discussion post; you do NOT need to address all
of them:
1. Why do you think Serra chose Cor-Ten steel as his material for Tilted Arc?
2. Do you live or work near public sculpture? What is it like to share your living or working
space with public art?
3. If you worked in a building on or near Foley Federal Plaza in Manhattan, and tended to
eat your lunch in the plaza on nice summer days, how would you feel if the government
placed Tilted Arc there? Would you think it was cool that the work of a rising American
art star shared your lunchtime space? Would you find it irritating to have to walk around
it on your way across the plaza? Would you give the situation none of your attention?
4. Once the government acknowledged the public’s dislike of this work, what should have
happened: To ask the artist if the work could be relocated? To give the work back to the
artist, even though he had been paid for it? What might have been the best solution?
* * *
ARTS 1A Midterm Exercise
The midterm exercise requires an essay response to the prompt below. The exercise is worth 40 points. Use your
class notes to complete this exercise.
* * *
The following is your essay prompt:
How do art historians categorize the different subjects explored by artists? And why do artists work within
specific subject categories?
Note: The subject categories we have been studying in class include: landscape, history, portraiture, genre,
and still life.
* * *
Carefully consider these guidelines:
1. Do NOT do “outside” online or library research to answer the questions in your essay prompt. Instead, use
the materials provided in class during the first five weeks: the chapters, documents, spotlight on technique
videos, and readings.
2. Think for yourself. Use independent thinking to interpret the works of art we have explored together in class,
along with the voices of writers of our documents, the authors of our readings, and the people who have
demonstrated different techniques in the videos. As you rely on these writers and artists, quote directly from
the documents, videos, and readings, and if you rely on what I have written in the chapters, place “quotes”
around that material, too, if you use it. You do not need to include footnotes when you quote our class
material—just make it clear within your essay who you are quoting.
3. Question: How long should your essay be? Answer: As long as you need it to be. There is no specific page
length required, but this is your opportunity to demonstrate what you have learned in the full first half of our
class. As such, answer the questions in the prompt thoroughly. Discuss works of art in detail. Aim to explore
at least ten works of art discussed in class—possibly more—in your response. Aim to explore at least four
documents, in detail, possibly more. Aim to explore at least four of the spotlight on technique videos
(possibly more), and at least four of the readings (possibly more).
4. Type and double-space your essay, using a 12-pt font, and save it as a single pdf or Word doc. Upload your
finished document to Canvas in the “Week 6” module. Make sure you place your own name in the file name.
If we had a student in our class named Jesse Chavez, he would name his document as follows:
JesseChavez Midterm 1A.pdf. He would also place his full name on the essay itself.
* * *
Grading Rubric
16 points
6 points
6 points
6 points
3 points
3 points
Analysis of works of art discussed in class, in detail
Use of weekly Documents
Use of weekly Spotlight on Technique Videos
Use of weekly Reading Exercises
Clarity (Communicate your ideas clearly.)
Thoroughness (Fully answer both questions included in the prompt.)
40 points
TOTAL
ARTS 1A
Chapter 5
Chapter 5
This week’s chapter will be divided into two section.
The first section will explore our fifth and final subject category:
still life.
The second section will explore works of art which do not fit
into any of the five subject categories—not landscape, not
history, not portraiture, not genre, not still life. When works of
art have no recognizable forms, we refer to them as nonrepresentational art. Examples of non-representational art are
explored in the second part of this chapter.
Part 1
Still life
First, watch the following short video, “Cézanne’s
Still Lifes at His Studio: Aix-en-Provence, France”:

Pair 1: Cézanne and Chardin
Paul Cézanne
I. Still life is a subject category in which the representation
inanimate objects is the most important aspect of the work of
art. Students who attended art school in France in the
nineteenth century spent a good deal of time painting objects,
ultimately to demonstrate to their teachers that they could
convey a sense of three-dimensionality on a flat surface. Most
students attempted to create the illusion of three-dimensionality
through careful consideration of light value, as they attended to
the depiction of shadows and highlights. Paul Cézanne chose to
model objects with color in addition to light value.
Paul Cézanne
Still Life with Apples and Pears
c. 1891-92
Oil on canvas
II. One of the reasons Cézanne’s still life paintings are
considered visually powerful is because he chose to use colors
that were mixed with very little black or white paint. Color
intensity refers to the degree of purity of a color;
Cézanne’s Still Life with Apples and Pears is an example of
a painting in which the color intensity is strong. The
shadows cast by objects are not produced with greys but
with violets, blues, and greens. The brightest highlights on
the objects are not produced with white but with different
versions of yellow.
Jean-Baptise-Siméon Chardin
I. More than a century and a half before Cézanne produced
Still Life with Apples and Pears, another academically-trained
French painter, Chardin, produced a still life painting, Attributes
of the Painter, which represents materials and tools used by oil
painters. Oil paint is a painting medium in which pigment is
mixed with linseed oil. Oil paint is known for its tendency to
dry slowly; for its translucent quality; for the wide variety of
colors that may be produced with it; and for its ability to be
used in varying qualities of thickness or thinness.
Jean-Baptiste-Siméon Chardin
Attributes of the Painter
1725-1727
Oil on canvas
II. A look at one of the objects in this still life—the painter’s
palette—reveals three colors placed next to each other which
are considered primary colors: those colors (red, yellow,
,
and blue) from which all other colors may be made.
While Chardin’s still life is produced largely by means of
earth colors like brown and red, the light blue color of the
rolled-up paper to the right of the palette indicates that
Chardin attempted to balance his composition by
offsetting the warm reds at the left with a cool blue at the
right.
Analysis Exercises: Pair 1
Exercise 1: Who was likely to purchase a still life painting from
Cézanne? Or from Chardin? Please provide a rationale for your
response, based on the works of art themselves.
Exercise 2: Why do you think so many artists throughout history
have used fruit as a still life subject?
Exercise 3: Both Chardin and Cézanne were oil painters, a
painting medium recognized in part for the wide variety of colors
that may be produced with it. How did these artists approach
color differently?
Pair 1
Pair 2: David Bailly and Rebecca Scott
David Bailly
I. David Bailly was a seventeenth-century Dutch artist who
produced still life paintings which served to encourage people to
consider their attitudes about money and ambition. Such works
are called vanitas paintings. Vanitas is a theme within literature
and art which warns about the emptiness of wealth and power.
By the time Bailly produced Vanitas Still Life of 1651, The
Netherlands had become the most wealthy county in Europe due
to its participation in the global mercantile economy, based in part
on colonialist practices.
David Bailly
Vanitas Still Life
1651
Oil on wood
II. David Bailly included objects in this still life which ask
viewers to consider their mortality. Such objects are called
memento mori, which means “be mindful of your own
mortality”. The candle has been snuffed out, the bubbles are
about to burst, the flower is dying. But the most obvious
memento mori is a skull. Dutch patrons of vanitas paintings were
usually religious people who believed in an afterlife, and felt that
it was better to give one’s money to charity than get bogged
down by it during one’s lifetime. On illusionistically painted
“paper” in the lower right corner the artist has painted the words
“VANITAS VANITUM ET OMNIA VANITAS,” which means
”Vanity, vanity. All is vanity,” a quote from the ancient Jewish
King Solomon found in the Book of Ecclesiastes.
Rebecca Scott
I. Like David Bailly, British contemporary artist Rebecca Scott
paints still life works to encourage viewers to consider their
values. Her oil painting, Oh, it’s a perfect day is from a series she
calls “Perfect Life.” She finds inspiration in photographs of
expensive luxury objects in commercial home furnishing
catalogues. Fine bedding and fashionable tableware figure
prominently in this series.
Rebecca Scott’s technical approach to oil painting is painterly,
that is, it calls attention to brushstrokes as evidence of the
painted process. David Bailly, on the other hand, concealed his
brushwork, painting with small, fine strokes.
Rebecca Scott
Oh, it’s a perfect day
From the “Perfect Life” series
2005
Oil on canvas
II. The table top in Rebecca Scott’s Oh, it’s a perfect day
reveals a wide range of color, including secondary colors: colors
which may be made by mixing two or more primary colors.
Green, orange, and violet are examples of secondary colors.
Pair 2
Analysis Exercises: Pair 2
Exercise 1: Do you prefer to look at paintings in which the artist
has taken a painterly approach, as in Rebecca Scott’s work
discussed in this chapter, or do you prefer the approach of
David Bailly, which is more detailed?
Exercise 2: If you were to hang a still life painting in your home,
would you want it to convey a message, or would you prefer to
enjoy it on a “formal” level, that is, from the stan …
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