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All requirement in document. you need to write approximately 1500-1800You DO NOT have to read all of The Odyssey! Read the following “books”: Books 5-6, 8-12Then visit the modern version website (see supplements) and read Books 20-23. You may want to read some of others there too. Each book has a nice little summary at the top, so you may want to go through each book just to get the highlights.https://troy.instructure.com/courses/47323/pages/p…username: sshanPassword: Wx2110980306Actually, u can just log in the canvas in this TROYONLINE World Literature Before 1660 ENG-2205-XTIFO 19/T4 (Paquette) course and get into the modules find the final project information.
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“Heroes or Zeroes” Literary Essay with Turnitin
The first component of the Final Project is the literary essay. The purpose of the literary essay is twofold: 1) to provide you with an opportunity to use the composition skills acquired in ENG 1101 and
reading and analysis skills acquired in ENG 1102, and 2) to demonstrate an ability to write about
literature using textual evidence to support assertions.
In a literary essay, you are exploring the meaning and construction of a piece of literature. A literary
essay focuses on such elements as character, theme, style, tone, and setting. You are taking a piece
of writing and trying to discover how and why it is put together the way it is. You must adopt a
viewpoint on the work(s) in question and show how the details of the work support your viewpoint. A
literary essay will be a mixture of your own interpretation based on your reading and references to the
work.
Task in Detail:
To help you prepare this component of the final project, you will be writing in phases. You will be
given a topic this week (week 4) for which you will need to write approximately 1500-1800 (aim to get
as close as possible for the 1st draft). You will receive instructions on submitting the draft. Don’t
forget to make use of the reading reflections you have been writing in your journal to help you with
this paper. Next week (week 5) you will be tasked with reading some of your classmates’ papers and
providing feedback to them in a peer review assignment. In week 6, you will take the feedback that
has been provided and modify your writing. This is when you will want to make sure that you have
met the required word count. You will have a second peer review of the revised paper in week 7.
Considering all of the feedback provided to you through both peer review and from myself, revise your
paper to meet the literary essay requirements outlined below. Keep in mind, you may decide to
incorporate ideas from the additional readings that you will have covered by this time. The final essay
will be uploaded to Turnitin and posted here on your wiki page. MAKE SURE YOU SEE THE
ASSIGNMENT BELOW.
There are four (4) required elements in the final literary essay which should be between 4-5
pages:
a) An introduction with a thesis statement
b) The body of the paper with arguments and support evidence
c) A conclusion that summarizes the entire paper
d) Works Cited page in MLA format
Additional Resources:





This is a great resource on How to Write a Literary Analysis Essay.
This is a great resource on Writing a Good Thesis Statement.
This will help you better understand Integrating Quotations from a Literary Text
This is a great resource on MLA Formatting and Style Guidelines.
Here is a Sample Student Essay: Literary Analysis with Primary Source in MLA.
Compact Anthology of World Literature
dlestick, and light the lamps thereof. 5 And thou shalt set the golden altar for incense before the ark of the testimony, and put the screen of the door to the tabernacle. 6 And thou shalt set the altar of burnt-offering before the door
of the tabernacle of the tent of meeting. 7 And thou shalt set the laver between the tent of meeting and the altar,
and shalt put water therein. 8 And thou shalt set up the court round about, and hang up the screen of the gate of
the court. 9 And thou shalt take the anointing oil, and anoint the tabernacle, and all that is therein, and shalt hallow
it, and all the furniture thereof: and it shall be holy. 10 And thou shalt anoint the altar of burnt-offering, and all its
vessels, and sanctify the altar: and the altar shall be most holy. 11 And thou shalt anoint the laver and its base, and
sanctify it. 12 And thou shalt bring Aaron and his sons unto the door of the tent of meeting, and shalt wash them
with water. 13 And thou shalt put upon Aaron the holy garments; and thou shalt anoint him, and sanctify him, that
he may minister unto me in the priest’s office. 14 And thou shalt bring his sons, and put coats upon them; 15 and thou
shalt anoint them, as thou didst anoint their father, that they may minister unto me in the priest’s office: and their
anointing shall be to them for an everlasting priesthood throughout their generations.
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Thus did Moses: according to all that Jehovah commanded him, so did he.
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And it came to pass in the first month in the second year, on the first day of the month, that the tabernacle
was reared up. 18 And Moses reared up the tabernacle, and laid its sockets, and set up the boards thereof, and put in
the bars thereof, and reared up its pillars. 19 And he spread the tent over the tabernacle, and put the covering of the
tent above upon it; as Jehovah commanded Moses.
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And he took and put the testimony into the ark, and set the staves on the ark, and put the mercy-seat above
upon the ark: 21 and he brought the ark into the tabernacle, and set up the veil of the screen, and screened the ark of
the testimony; as Jehovah commanded Moses.
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And he put the table in the tent of meeting, upon the side of the tabernacle northward, without the veil.
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And he set the bread in order upon it before Jehovah; as Jehovah commanded Moses.
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And he put the candlestick in the tent of meeting, over against the table, on the side of the tabernacle southward. 25 And he lighted the lamps before Jehovah; as Jehovah commanded Moses.
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And he put the golden altar in the tent of meeting before the veil: 27 and he burnt thereon incense of sweet
spices; as Jehovah commanded Moses.
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And he put the screen of the door to the tabernacle. 29 And he set the altar of burnt-offering at the door of the
tabernacle of the tent of meeting, and offered upon it the burnt-offering and the meal-offering; as Jehovah commanded Moses.
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And he set the laver between the tent of meeting and the altar, and put water therein, wherewith to wash.
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And Moses and Aaron and his sons washed their hands and their feet thereat; 32 when they went into the tent of
meeting, and when they came near unto the altar, they washed; as Jehovah commanded Moses. 33 And he reared up
the court round about the tabernacle and the altar, and set up the screen of the gate of the court. So Moses finished
the work.
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Then the cloud covered the tent of meeting, and the glory of Jehovah filled the tabernacle. 35 And Moses was
not able to enter into the tent of meeting, because the cloud abode thereon, and the glory of Jehovah filled the tabernacle. 36 And when the cloud was taken up from over the tabernacle, the children of Israel went onward, throughout all their journeys: 37 but if the cloud was not taken up, then they journeyed not till the day that it was taken up.
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For the cloud of Jehovah was upon the tabernacle by day, and there was fire therein by night, in the sight of all the
house of Israel, throughout all their journeys.
The Epic of Gilgamesh
Oral and written versions between ca. 2500-1400 B.C.E.
Sumer/Babylon
The story of Gilgamesh survives as the oldest epic in literature because it was preserved by rival societies in
ancient Mesopotamia. The Sumerian story of this king of Uruk (modern day Warka in Iraq), who reigned around
approximately 2700 B.C.E., was retold and rewritten by Babylonian, Assyrian, and Hittite scribes. The Standard
Version, which modern scholars attribute to an Assyrian scribe/priest, combines many of the previous oral and
written variants of the tale. The version of the epic presented here is a compilation of the Standard Version (which
contains gaps where the tablets are damaged) and a variety of Assyrian, Babylonian, and Hittite versions that were
discovered later. In the story, Gilgamesh (who is two-thirds divine and one-third human, a marvel of modern
genetics) initially befriends Enkidu (also engineered by the gods) and then goes on a quest for immortality when he
realizes that even semi-divine beings must die. Kept in the library of the Assyrian King Assurbanipal, the twelve
clay tablets with the Standard Version were accidentally saved when, during the sack of Nineveh in 612 B.C.E., the
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The Epic of Gilgamesh
walls of the library were caved in on the tablets. Archeologists discovered the eleventh tablet in the mid-1800s,
which contains an account of the flood story that pre-dates the written version of the Biblical account of Noah,
leading to the recovery of all twelve tablets, plus additional fragments. In 2003, in Warka, they found what is
believed to be the tomb of Gilgamesh himself.
Sumerian/Babylonian Gods:

An (Babylonian: Anu): god of heaven; may have
been the main god before 2500 B.C.E.

Ninhursag (Babylonian: Aruru, Mammi): mother goddess; created the gods with An; assists in
creation of man.

Enlil (Babylonian: Ellil): god of air; pantheon
leader from 2500 B.C.E.; “father” of the gods because he is in charge (although An/Anu is actually
the father of many of them); king of heaven &
earth.

Enki (Babylonian: Ea): lord of the abyss and wisdom; god of water, creation, and fertility.

Nanna (Babylonian: Sin): moon god.

Inanna (Babylonian: Ishtar): goddess of love,
war, and fertility.

Utu (Babylonian: Shamash): god of the sun and
justice.

Ninlil (Babylonian: Mullitu, Mylitta): bride of
Enlil.
Image 1.7: The Flood Tablet | An original stone tablet,
Tablet 11, from the Epic of Gilgamesh.
Author: User “BabelStone”
Source: Wikimedia Commons
License: CC0 1.0
Written by Laura J. Getty
Editor’s Note: I am combining two open access translations (one by R. Campbell Thompson and one by William Muss-Arnolt). I have made changes freely to those texts in the interests of readability: accepting many suggested additions, deleting others, altering word choice, adding some punctuation, and eliminating some of the more
archaic language. By combining the two translations, the resulting text is as complete as I can make it at this point;
the Thompson translation in particular draws on many fragments from Assyrian, Babylonian, and Hittite tablets
that have been found after the Standard Version was discovered.
Edited by Laura J. Getty, University of North Georgia
The Epic of Gilgamesh
License: Open Access
R. Campbell Thompson and William Muse Arnold (Compiled by Laura Getty)
He who has discovered the heart of all matters, let him teach the nation;
He who all knowledge possesses should teach all the people;
He shall impart his wisdom, and so they shall share it together.
Gilgamesh—he was the Master of wisdom, with knowledge of all things;
He discovered concealed secrets, handed down a story of times before the flood,
Went on a journey far away, returned all weary and worn with his toiling,
Engraved on a table of stone his story.
He it was who built the ramparts of Uruk, the high-walled,
And he it was who set the foundation,
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Compact Anthology of World Literature
As solid as brass, of Eanna, the sacred temple of Anu and Ishtar,
Strengthened its base, its threshold….
Two-thirds of Gilgamesh are divine, and one-third of him human….
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[The tablet then tells how Gilgamesh becomes king of Uruk. The death of the previous king creates panic in the city,
described below.]
The she-asses have trampled down their foals;
The cows in madness turn upon their calves.
And as the cattle were frightened, so were the people.
Like the doves, the maidens sigh and mourn.
The gods of Uruk, the strong-walled,
Assume the shape of flies and buzz about the streets.
The protecting deities of Uruk, the strong-walled,
Take on the shape of mice and hurry into their holes.
Three years the enemy besieged the city of Uruk;
The city’s gates were barred, the bolts were shot.
And even Ishtar, the goddess, could not make headway against the enemy.
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[Then Gilgamesh comes to the city as her savior, and later on appears as her king. He saves the city, but unfortunately
his rule is tyrannical, and the people of Uruk complain to the gods.]
“You gods of heaven, and you, Anu,
Who brought my son into existence, save us!
He [Gilgamesh] has not a rival in all the land;
The shock of his weapons has no peer,
And cowed are the heroes of Uruk.
Your people now come to you for help.
Gilgamesh arrogantly leaves no son to his father,
Yet he should be the shepherd of the city.”
Day and night they poured out their complaint:
“He is the ruler of Uruk the strong-walled.
He is the ruler—strong, cunning—but
Gilgamesh does not leave a daughter to her mother,
Nor the maiden to the warrior, nor the wife to her husband.”
The gods of heaven heard their cry.
Anu gave ear, called the lady Aruru: “It was you, O Aruru,
Who made the first of mankind: create now a rival to him,
So that he can strive with him;
Let them fight together, and Uruk will be given relief.”
Upon hearing this Aruru created in her heart a man after the likeness of Anu.
Aruru washed her hands, took a bit of clay, and cast it on the ground.
Thus she created Enkidu, the hero, as if he were born of Ninurta (god of war and hunting).
His whole body was covered with hair; he had long hair on his head like a woman;
His flowing hair was luxuriant like that of the corn-god.
He ate herbs with the gazelles.
He quenched his thirst with the beasts.
He sported about with the creatures of the water.
Then did a hunter, a trapper, come face to face with this fellow,
Came on him one, two, three days, at the place where the beasts drank water.
But when he saw him the hunter’s face looked troubled
As he beheld Enkidu, and he returned to his home with his cattle.
He was sad, and moaned, and wailed;
His heart grew heavy, his face became clouded,
And sadness entered his mind.
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The Epic of Gilgamesh
The hunter opened his mouth and said, addressing his father:
“Father, there is a great fellow come forth from out of the mountains,
His strength is the greatest the length and breadth of the country,
Like to a double of Anu’s own self, his strength is enormous,
Ever he ranges at large over the mountains, and ever with cattle
Grazes on herbage and ever he sets his foot to the water,
So that I fear to approach him. The pits which I myself hollowed
With my own hands he has filled in again, and the traps that I set
Are torn up, and out of my clutches he has helped all the cattle escape,
And the beasts of the desert: to work at my fieldcraft, or hunt, he will not allow me.”
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His father opened his mouth and said, addressing the hunter:
“Gilgamesh dwells in Uruk, my son, whom no one has vanquished,
It is his strength that is the greatest the length and breadth of the country,
Like to a double of Anu’s own self, his strength is enormous,
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Go, set your face towards Uruk: and when he hears of a monster,
He will say ‘Go, O hunter, and take with you a courtesan-girl, a hetaera (a sacred temple girl from Eanna, the temple
of Ishtar).
When he gathers the cattle again in their drinking place,
So shall she put off her mantle, the charm of her beauty revealing;
Then he shall see her, and in truth will embrace her, and thereafter his cattle,
With which he was reared, with straightaway forsake him.’”
Image 1.8: Gilgamesh Statue | This statue of Gilgamesh
depicts him in his warrior’s outfit, holding a lion cub under one
arm.
Author: User “zayzayem”
Source: Wikimedia Commons
License: CC BY-SA 2.0
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Compact Anthology of World Literature
The hunter listened to the advice of his father and straightaway
He went to Gilgamesh, taking the road towards Uruk.
To Gilgamesh he came, and addressed his speech to him, saying:
“There is a great fellow come forth from out of the mountains,
His strength is the greatest the length and breadth of the country,
Like to a double of Anu’s own self, his strength is enormous,
Ever he ranges at large over the mountains, and ever with cattle
Grazes on herbage and ever he sets his foot to the water,
So that I fear to approach him. The pits which I myself hollowed
With mine own hands he has filled in again, and the traps that I set
Are torn up, and out of my clutches he has helped all the cattle escape,
And the beasts of the desert: to work at my fieldcraft, or hunt, he will not allow me.”
Gilgamesh made this answer to the hunter:
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“Go, O hunter, and take with you a courtesan-girl, a hetaera from Ishtar’s temple.
When he gathers the cattle again in their drinking place,
So shall she put off her mantle, the charm of her beauty revealing;
Then he shall see her, and in truth will embrace her, and thereafter his cattle,
With which he was reared, with straightaway forsake him.”
Forth went the hunter, took with him a courtesan-girl, a hetaera, the woman Shamhat;
Together they proceeded straightway, and
On the third day they reached the appointed field.
There the hunter and the hetaera rested.
One day, two days, they lurked at the entrance to the well,
Where the cattle were accustomed to slake their thirst,
Where the creatures of the waters were sporting.
Then came Enkidu, whose home was the mountains,
Who with gazelles ate herbs,
And with the cattle slaked his thirst,
And with the creatures of the waters rejoiced his heart.
And Shamhat beheld him.
“Behold, there he is,” the hunter exclaimed; “now reveal your body,
Uncover your nakedness, and let him enjoy your favors.
Be not ashamed, but yield to his sensuous lust.
He shall see you and shall approach you;
Remove your garment, and he shall lie in your arms;
Satisfy his desire after the manner of women;
Then his cattle, raised with him on the field, shall forsake him
While he firmly presses his breast on yours.”
And Shamhat revealed her body, uncovered her nakedness,
And let him enjoy her favors.
She was not ashamed, but yielded to his sensuous lust.
She removed her garment, he lay in her arms,
And she satisfied his desire after the manner of women.
He pressed his breast firmly upon hers.
For six days and seven nights Enkidu enjoyed the love of Shamhat.
And when he had sated himself with her charms,
He turned his face toward his cattle.
The gazelles, resting, beheld Enkidu; they and
The cattle of the field turned away from him.
This startled Enkidu and his body grew faint;
His knees became stiff, as his cattle departed,
And he became less agile than before.
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The Epic of Gilgamesh
And as he realized what had happened, he came to a decision.
He turned again, in love enthralled, to the feet of the temple girl,
And gazed up into the face of Shamhat.
And while she spoke, his ears listened attentively;
And Shmahat spoke to Enkidu and said:
“You are magnificant, Enkidu, you shall be like a god;
Why, then, do you lie down with the beasts of the field?
Come, I will take you to strong-walled Uruk;
To the glorious house, the dwelling of Anu and Ishtar,
The palace of Gilgamesh, the hero who is perfect in strength,
Surpassing, like a mountain bull, men in power.”
While she spoke this way to him, he listened to her wise speech.
And Enkidu spoke to her, the temple girl:
“Come then, Shamhat, take me, and lead me
To the glorious dwelling, the sacred seat of Anu and Ishtar,
To the palace of Gilgamesh, the hero who is perfect in strength,
Surpassing, like as a mountain bull, men in power. I will challenge him.”
Shamhat warned Enkidu, saying:
“You will see Gilgamesh.
I have seen his face; it glows with heroic courage.
Strength he possesses, magnificent is his whole body.
His power is stronger than yours.
He rests not nor tires, neither by day nor by night.
O Enkidu, change your intention.
Shamash loves Gilgamesh;
Anu and Ea are whispering wisdom into his ear.
Before you come down from the mountain
Gilgamesh will have seen you in a dream in Uruk.”
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[Gilgamesh had a dream and was troubled because he could not interpret it.]
Gilgamesh came, to understand the dream, and said to his mother:
“My mother, I dreamed a dream in my nightly vision;
The stars of heaven, like Anu’s host, fell upon me.
Although I w …
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